Doctoral Students

 

Jonathan Avery, PhD candidate

University of Ottawa
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j averyJonathan Avery is a qualitative health researcher in training with a background in psychology (BA Honours, York University, 2005) and communication (MA, University of Ottawa, 2009). Jonathan found his way to the field of rehabilitation serendipitously by working in cancer survivorship care for a number of years. He then gained the opportunity to pursue his doctorate in the field at the University of Ottawa. Jonathan has always been fascinated with health, illness and disability. As a non-clinician, his multi-disciplinary background brings a unique perspective to the field by utilizing his knowledge of psychology and communication to advance our knowledge in rehabilitation.

Currently, Jonathan’s doctoral research is focused on exploring elements of the cancer survivorship care. Cancer survivorship care can mean different things to different people. However, it can be used to describe how medical, supportive, and rehabilitative care is delivered from the day of diagnosis to end of life. His dissertation is focused on exploring the concepts of empowerment, personal autonomy, and control as it relates to how people perceive their experience with cancer and how they engage, participate, and manage the physical, social, and psychological impact of diagnosis and treatment.

Outside of the research world, Jonathan is an avid walker. He enjoys exploring the cultural diversity of Toronto where he currently resides as a research trainee at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. In terms of future aspirations, Jonathan hopes to continue to build his qualitative competencies and to develop his own program of research around how people experience and adapt to illness and disability.

 

Josée Boulanger, PhD candidate

University of Ottawa
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josee boulangerAs a PhD candidate in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Ottawa, I will be looking at notions of shared capacity in the context of supported decision making by people labelled with an intellectual disability. My interest in reconceptualizing capacity was sparked by learning about formal networks of support like Arohas, Microboards and Self-directed Support Corporations. These person-centered non-profit corporations exist for the purpose of supporting the focus person to make decisions about their life based on their interests, needs and values. My goal is to contribute to our understanding of shared capacity as a foundational concept in support of people labelled with intellectual disabilities to direct (or co-direct) their own lives. People labelled with an intellectual disability, their families, agencies and policy-makers will be able to draw from the results of this research when creating support systems.

 

Kristen Haase, PhD candidate

University of Ottawa
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kristen haaseKristen Haase is a doctoral candidate under the supervision of Drs. Roanne Thomas and Wendy Gifford in the School of Nursing at the University of Ottawa. Kristen completed a Bachelor’s Degree of Nursing at the University of Lethbridge, and a Master of Art’s in Women’s Studies at Saint Mary’s University. Kristen has held staff nursing positions in emergency, orthopedics, medicine and research in a variety of rural and urban settings. Presently, Kristen is employed as a lecturer with the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan.   

Kristen’s doctoral work has been supported by a fellowship from the CIHR strategic training program in psychosocial oncology (PORT), a doctoral fellowship from Groupe de Recherche Interuniversitaire en Interventions en Sciences Infirmières du Québec (GRIISIQ), and numerous other fellowships and awards. Kristen has also received a research grant to fund her project from the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology.

Kristen’s dissertation work explores how the use of internet information and support by individuals with cancer shapes their understanding of illness and treatment, their relationships with providers and their use of health services.  

 

Shirin Shallwani, PhD candidate

University of Ottawa
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shirin shallwaniShirin is a physiotherapist and certified lymphedema therapist specialized in cancer rehabilitation. She obtained her BSc in Physical Therapy and MSc in Rehabilitation Science from McGill University and has recently started her PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Ottawa. Shirin has extensive clinical experience in lymphedema management as well as rehabilitation for patients with hematological malignancies, breast cancer and gynecological cancers. She teaches as a guest lecturer at the McGill University School of Physical and Occupational Therapy and volunteers with the Canadian Physiotherapy Association Oncology Division. Her research interests lie in the area of cancer rehabilitation and effective knowledge translation strategies for this patient population.

 

 

Viviane Grandpierre, PhD candidate

University of Ottawa
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v grandpierreViviane holds a Bachelor of Honours degree in Linguistics and a Masters degree in Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies. While pursuing these degrees, she took particular interest in the field of cross-cultural communication. While working at the Audiology Research Lab at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, she decided to pursue her research interests from a health care perspective. She is now a Doctoral Candidate in the Rehabilitation Sciences program at the University of Ottawa where she is focusing on improving cultural competency in health care interventions. 

 

 

 

 

 

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